youmightfindyourself:

A Map of the Futuristic Los Angeles Subway From Spike Jonze’s "Her"
Rad subway system designed by Geoff McFetridge. The system ranges from the Angeles National Forest to Malibu over five lines, with stops at some familiar places and some completely invented (I especially love the stations named “Nail Spot” and “Hair Salon”). A new neighborhood, Melrose Center, which I would guess to be around modern-day Koreatown, has become a major hub, bigger than present-day downtown. And for those who bemoan our current transit options at the airport: The train not only goes to LAX now, but it makes THREE stops!
Most notable are the paths of some of the lines. While the gold/teal path almost traces the real-life Gold and Expo Lines (which will bring light rail to Santa Monica in 2015), others seem to mimic current freeway routes. There’s a junction named 101 Freeway Axis, and the orange line running over the Sepulveda Pass looks like it basically traces the 405 Freeway. Who knows? With this system up and running, we might be constructing the light rail lines over abandoned freeways in the future.
McFetridge would especially like to call attention to the fictional transit authority named Los Angeles Metro Light Rail (LAMLR) and the logo he designed for it: “From the Summit to the Sea.”

This was the most interesting part of the film for me.

youmightfindyourself:

A Map of the Futuristic Los Angeles Subway From Spike Jonze’s "Her"

Rad subway system designed by Geoff McFetridge. The system ranges from the Angeles National Forest to Malibu over five lines, with stops at some familiar places and some completely invented (I especially love the stations named “Nail Spot” and “Hair Salon”). A new neighborhood, Melrose Center, which I would guess to be around modern-day Koreatown, has become a major hub, bigger than present-day downtown. And for those who bemoan our current transit options at the airport: The train not only goes to LAX now, but it makes THREE stops!

Most notable are the paths of some of the lines. While the gold/teal path almost traces the real-life Gold and Expo Lines (which will bring light rail to Santa Monica in 2015), others seem to mimic current freeway routes. There’s a junction named 101 Freeway Axis, and the orange line running over the Sepulveda Pass looks like it basically traces the 405 Freeway. Who knows? With this system up and running, we might be constructing the light rail lines over abandoned freeways in the future.

McFetridge would especially like to call attention to the fictional transit authority named Los Angeles Metro Light Rail (LAMLR) and the logo he designed for it: “From the Summit to the Sea.”

This was the most interesting part of the film for me.

  1. whiskeyspirits reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  2. heartsnatcher reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  3. asiancracker reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  4. tompenny50 reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  5. n-e-v-e-r-s-l-e-e-p reblogged this from rlnc
  6. foryouilldotheweirdestshit reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  7. dia-cha reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  8. cha-d reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  9. sarahsosiak reblogged this from youmightfindyourself and added:
    Love this. I’ve been itching to visit Her’s LA since seeing the film.
  10. ha-na reblogged this from rlnc
  11. rlnc reblogged this from youmightfindyourself and added:
    Noice
  12. vogotbeatz reblogged this from -gaaabs
  13. isleptwithvanessa reblogged this from youmightfindyourself
  14. -gaaabs reblogged this from dreamschemesupreme and added:
    10/10 would watch again