cheesequake:

txnk:

loversornothing:

presentreign:

Everyone IN NY should read this

Everyone who wants to come to NY should read this

Everyone should read this if you’re thinking about NY in any way, shape or form.

Good to know for when I live there next year! :)

This is fantastic, definitely want a summer trip!

Is there such a thing as feeling homesick for somewhere you’ve only visited?

cheesequake There’s a word for it in Welsh:  Hiraeth (Welsh)

A feeling of longing associated with displacement, but not necessarily displacement from one’s original home. An intense yearning to be somewhere you are not. http://betterthanenglish.com/hiraeth-welsh/

slaughterhouse90210:

“Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. … It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world’s greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see.”― Ann Patchett, Bel Canto

This is me.

slaughterhouse90210:

“Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. … It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world’s greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see.”
― Ann Patchett,
Bel Canto

This is me.

Nerd Monster Radio Episode 9 - Fake French

Welcome to episode 9 of Nerd Monster Radio. This week, I wanted to gather up some songs from bands that have been scattered through out previous podcast, primarily of the French variety. While some non-french songs got in the mix, most songs feature at least some French, and most of them border on dance music. So I hope you’re ready for a good frenchy time. Download Podcast Here. SUBSCRIBE HERE.

0. SONG - BAND - ALBUM
1. C’est la Mort - Stereo Total - Oh Ah
2. Que veux-tu (Madeon remix) - YELLE
3. Hit-Pop - Numéro# - L’Idéologie des Stars
4. Jique - Brazilian Girls - Talk To La Bomb
5. Sha la la la lee - Plastic Bertrand - Ça plane pour moi
6. Shag Ball - Electrocute - Troublesome Bubblegum
7. Compagnon de la vie  - Amadou & Mariam - Welcome to Mali
8. Ce jeu - Yelle - Pop-up
9. merde a l’amour - vive la fete - 10 ans de fete
10. 2 Hearts - Digitalism - I Love You, Dude
11. Mer Du Japon - Air - Pocket Symphony
12. Fake French - Le Tigre - Feminist Sweepstakes

weakinteractions:

Alien Atmospheres
As astronomers continue to detect planets orbiting far-away stars, they are beginning to wonder — if there are so many planets out there, how likely is it that our planet is unique? Could any of these planets sustain life? Is there, perhaps, already life there?
The best way of searching for life on these planets — since they are much too far away to send spacecraft — is by scanning the planets’ atmospheres for gases that might indicate the presence of life.
A new study from NASA scientists helps pinpoint which combinations of gases astronomers should look for. The scientists developed simulations of a variety of different types of atmospheres around different types of suns, to find the possible molecular signatures one might expect to see from non-biological sources. They published their results in The Astrophysical Journal last week.
The presence of certain gases is unexpected on lifeless planets, because they will react with other molecules present in the atmosphere. For them to persist, there needs to be a source — life. Therefore, to search for life, astronomers could look for those suggestive gases in the atmosphere.
Oxygen might seem like a good place to start. Oxygen on earth is produced predominantly by photosynthesis from living creatures. Oxygen is mostly found in the molecular form of O2, or two oxygen molecules bonded together.  Ozone (O3) is produced in the atmosphere from O2 interacting with sunlight. Both of these are possible indicators of life.
But there are also non-biological processes that produce oxygen, which could serve as a red-herring. Carbon dixoide (CO2) for instance, is produced by volcanic activity on earth, and when it interacts with ultraviolet light in the atmosphere, it produces oxygen, leaving behind carbon monoxide (CO).
To eliminate false positives, the scientists concluded, it would help to know  about the presence of other gases, too. Oxygen in combination with carbon monoxide (CO), for instance, indicates that the source of the oxygen might be CO2, and not alien life.
But oxygen in combination with methane (CH4) is a likely signal of life, because oxygen interacts with related molecules when both are present in the atmosphere, depleting the supply of both — unless there’s another source.
To look for such gases in distant atmospheres, scientists study the spectrum of a star with a planet in orbit around it. (The spectrum of light is basically a measurement of what colors of light the star emits. But stars emit light beyond the range of what humans can see, which must be measured as well.) They measure the spectrum of light as the planet eclipses the star, which tells them what light is absorbed by the planet’s atmosphere. 
It’s a tricky measurement. Analyzing the results, scientists have now shown, will be tricky as well.
Image Source: ”Triple-star sunset” by NASA/JPL-Caltech. Original uploader was SnoopY at en.wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

weakinteractions:

Alien Atmospheres

As astronomers continue to detect planets orbiting far-away stars, they are beginning to wonder — if there are so many planets out there, how likely is it that our planet is unique? Could any of these planets sustain life? Is there, perhaps, already life there?

The best way of searching for life on these planets — since they are much too far away to send spacecraft — is by scanning the planets’ atmospheres for gases that might indicate the presence of life.

A new study from NASA scientists helps pinpoint which combinations of gases astronomers should look for. The scientists developed simulations of a variety of different types of atmospheres around different types of suns, to find the possible molecular signatures one might expect to see from non-biological sources. They published their results in The Astrophysical Journal last week.

The presence of certain gases is unexpected on lifeless planets, because they will react with other molecules present in the atmosphere. For them to persist, there needs to be a source — life. Therefore, to search for life, astronomers could look for those suggestive gases in the atmosphere.

Oxygen might seem like a good place to start. Oxygen on earth is produced predominantly by photosynthesis from living creatures. Oxygen is mostly found in the molecular form of O2, or two oxygen molecules bonded together.  Ozone (O3) is produced in the atmosphere from O2 interacting with sunlight. Both of these are possible indicators of life.

But there are also non-biological processes that produce oxygen, which could serve as a red-herring. Carbon dixoide (CO2) for instance, is produced by volcanic activity on earth, and when it interacts with ultraviolet light in the atmosphere, it produces oxygen, leaving behind carbon monoxide (CO).

To eliminate false positives, the scientists concluded, it would help to know  about the presence of other gases, too. Oxygen in combination with carbon monoxide (CO), for instance, indicates that the source of the oxygen might be CO2, and not alien life.

But oxygen in combination with methane (CH4) is a likely signal of life, because oxygen interacts with related molecules when both are present in the atmosphere, depleting the supply of both — unless there’s another source.

To look for such gases in distant atmospheres, scientists study the spectrum of a star with a planet in orbit around it. (The spectrum of light is basically a measurement of what colors of light the star emits. But stars emit light beyond the range of what humans can see, which must be measured as well.) They measure the spectrum of light as the planet eclipses the star, which tells them what light is absorbed by the planet’s atmosphere. 

It’s a tricky measurement. Analyzing the results, scientists have now shown, will be tricky as well.

Image Source: ”Triple-star sunset” by NASA/JPL-Caltech. Original uploader was SnoopY at en.wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

dinosauradvocate:

proofmathisbeautiful posted this today: http://proofmathisbeautiful.tumblr.com/post/93404320217/ketchuprocket-all-the-other-humans-fucking
I felt the need to do the math out. m is the weight of the corner weights, M is the table’s weight, and L is the side length of the table. h is how far the table is from the ceiling, and theta is the shown angle. Theta seemed useless to me, so my final answer included the other variables. Now, if you want to do this with a specific table and a specific height, you can solve for the masses to put on the corners… I’m tempted to!

How to make the most beautiful table ever seen.

dinosauradvocate:

proofmathisbeautiful posted this today: http://proofmathisbeautiful.tumblr.com/post/93404320217/ketchuprocket-all-the-other-humans-fucking

I felt the need to do the math out. m is the weight of the corner weights, M is the table’s weight, and L is the side length of the table. h is how far the table is from the ceiling, and theta is the shown angle. Theta seemed useless to me, so my final answer included the other variables. Now, if you want to do this with a specific table and a specific height, you can solve for the masses to put on the corners… I’m tempted to!

How to make the most beautiful table ever seen.